Secure
100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Cialis for Women: Is it Real? Does it Work?


cialis-for-womenSexual problems affect both men and women, even if they do show in different ways. However, while medications for erectile dysfunction, the main male sexual disorder, have been approved, used and even become popular a long time ago, a similar solution has yet to be found for the female equivalent of this disorder.

The problem of arousal in women is more complex than it is for men because there is no apparent sexual function directly linked to it. This leads a lot of people, medical professionals included, to believe that the lack of arousal or desire is more a psychological than physical problem for women.

That is not to say that women can’t use physical stimulants to try and awaken their libido. In the absence of a dedicated female sexual dysfunction drug, women have turned to what they know. Some women, in and out of medical and research labs, are taking drugs like Viagra, Levitra and Cialis, and results from monitored trials show that, while women may not suffer from the exact same sexual problems as men, these drugs can still work for them at some level.

While the root problem may be different, the experience of women (not all though) who have tried Cialis may lead us to believe that the effect of Cialis on women seems in a way similar to those experienced by men. Menopausal women, who are particularly prone to sexual dysfunction due to the hormonal deficiency and lack of lubrication brought on by age, are said to be able to regain lubrication, reawaken their libido and even sustain long-lasting erections in their clitoris.

In the broader spectrum, a few studies have shown that Cialis had no effect on women with Hypoactive Desire Disorder, and it didn’t affect the levels of desire of any women in general. It did, however, enhance the arousal, lubrication and intensity of orgasms for some groups of women - whether they were pre- or post-menopausal, and showed symptoms of sexual dysfunction or not.

Cialis, as well as other ED drugs, do not seem to have any effect on women's propensity for having fantasies or the frequency of their sexual activity.

Adverse effects are mostly mild to moderate, and they are consistent with what’s observed in men. The symptoms include headaches, nausea, flushing and, in some cases, temporary visual difficulties.

Cialis is also a medication used for regulating blood pressure, especially in the lungs, and while it is mainly known as an ED drug, it is also approved and prescribed for this use. Irrespective of gender, people can take Cialis to treat this kind of condition too, in which case any sexual related symptoms/benefits would be considered a side effect of the drug. Caution is thus advised, and the drug is usually only prescribed to women with blood pressure issues in very specific cases.

Lastly, we must talk about the phenomenon of actual “Cialis for Women”. This is not always the same drug that is used for male sexual dysfunction, but rather a different product (although with the same main ingredient, tadalafil) that has yet to be approved and that uses the name of the popular drug as an advertising strategy.

The fact of the matter is that only one drug has been approved so far to treat female sexual dysfunction — and it’s not Cialis. But while the original Cialis is rather safe and can be beneficial for some women, it is important to be cautious when taking drugs that haven’t been prescribed or even approved for the intended use.